DIAGNOSTIC ENDOSCOPY

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Endoscopy is the insertion of a long, thin tube directly into the body to observe an internal organ or tissue in detail. It can also be used to carry out other tasks including imaging and minor surgery.Alternatively, they can be inserted into small incisions, for instance, in the knee or abdomen. Surgery completed through a small incision and assisted with special instruments, such as the endoscope, is called keyhole surgery.Because modern endoscopy has relatively few risks, delivers detailed images, and is quick to carry out, it has proven incredibly useful in many areas of medicine. Today, tens of millions of endoscopies are carried out each year.In this article, we will explain some of the types of endoscopy, why and how they are performed, the general procedure, and any potential risks. Advice will be provided by a doctor on how to prepare for an endoscopy, as different procedures will have different requirements.The procedure does not require an overnight stay in the hospital and usually only takes around 1 hour to complete.

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The doctor will provide instructions about the preparation for the procedure.For many types of endoscopy, the individual needs to fast for around 12 hours, though this varies based on the type.For procedures investigating the gut, laxatives may be taken the night before to clear the system.A doctor will carry out an examination before the endoscopy. It is important to mention all current medications (including supplements) and any previous procedures.

Endoscope Use in Surgery?

Endoscopy has advanced in recent years, enabling some forms of surgery to be conducted using a modified endoscope; this makes the surgery less invasive.Procedures such as the removal of the gallbladder, sealing and tying the fallopian tubes and the removal of small tumors from the digestive system or lungs are now commonplace.A laparoscope is a modified endoscope used for keyhole surgery (also referred to as laparoscopic surgery).Laparoscopic surgery requires only a small incision and can be used for appendectomies (removal of the appendix), hysterectomies (removal of the uterus) and prostatectomies (removal of prostate tissue).Using this technique, patients lose less blood during and after surgery and can recover much faster compared with standard surgical procedures.

What Happens After an Endoscopy?

Most endoscopies are outpatient procedures. This means you can go home the same day.Your doctor will close incision wounds with stitches and properly bandage them immediately after the procedure. Your doctor will give you instructions on how to care for this wound on your own.Afterward, you’ll likely have to wait for one to two hours in the hospital for the effects of the sedation to wear off. A friend or family member will drive you home. Once you’re home, you should plan to spend the remainder of the day resting.Some procedures may leave you slightly uncomfortable. It may require some time to feel well enough to go about your daily business. For example, following an upper GI endoscopy, you may have a sore throat and need to eat soft foods for a couple days. You may have blood in your urine after a cystoscopy to examine your bladder. This should pass within 24 hours, but you should contact your doctor if it persists.If your doctor suspects a cancerous growth, they’ll perform a biopsy during your endoscopy. The results will take a few days. Your doctor will discuss the results with you after they get them back from the laboratory.